The World Chess Championship Comes To New York City

6Levon Aronian2786 PLAYERELO RATING 1Magnus Carlsen2853 Source: 2700chess.com 3Vladimir Kramnik2811 7Viswanathan Anand2779 5Wesley So2794 10Pentala Harikrishna2770 4Maxime Vachier-Lagrave2807 One chess grandmaster represents the most democratic country in the world. The other supports, and is supported by, Vladimir Putin. Last night, inside the Plaza Hotel in midtown Manhattan — that urban palace and President-elect Donald Trump’s captured rook — the two prepared to do battle.The World Chess Championship has come to New York City. The tournament captured this city’s imagination once before, in 1972, when its favorite Brooklyn son, Bobby Fischer, clashed with the Soviets in Reykjavik. But this year New Yorkers can only watch, as the Norwegian defending champion Magnus Carlsen and his Russian challenger Sergey Karjakin vie for the game’s highest title. They’re both kids: Carlsen is 25 and Karjakin is 26, yet they’ve lived half their lives as grandmasters. The match is being billed as the youngest championship ever.Here in New York, the faces of chess are diverse, from the outdoor hustlers lining park tables in Washington Square or Union Square to the excellent middle school chess program of I.S. 318 in Brooklyn. But last night, at the pre-tournament Black & White Gala at The Plaza, the guests were nearly all white. Under potted palm trees and crystal chandeliers, the steak was carved and the champagne and martinis flowed, and the scene recalled a VIP cocktail hour in a Vegas penthouse suite before a heavyweight prizefight. (At least the ones I’ve seen in the movies.) 2Fabiano Caruana2823 9Sergey Karjakin2772 8Hikaru Nakamura2779 As both baby-faced competitors faced the camera flashes and microphones, Carlsen looked calm. He has reached the championship before, after all. Karjakin looked a bit lost — nervous, maybe — his voice barely audible above the reporters’ din. And indeed, despite Karjakin’s slightly earlier prodigious bloom, the consensus heavy favorite is Carlsen. He’s rated No. 1 in the world, while Karjakin is No. 9.The best-of-12 match could stretch past Thanksgiving. Game 1 begins Friday afternoon, in downtown Manhattan. My own Elo-based simulations1I simulated 10,000 matches using the players’ current Elo ratings, and assumed that they draw half of their games, which is historically what grandmasters tend to do. The methodology is similar to what I used to simulate the 2014 world chess championships. give Carlsen an 88 percent chance of defending his title. Bookmakers put his chances somewhere between 80 and 85 percent. I’ll be reporting from the match, here and on Twitter. read more

Womens swimming Ohio State set to travel to Indiana for Big Ten

The Ohio State women’s swimming team practice at the McCorkle Aquatic Pavilion in preparation for the Big Ten Championships. Credit: Fallon Perl | Lantern reporterAfter completing its regular season just one meet shy of undefeated, the No. 22 Ohio State women’s swimming team is looking forward to taking its talents to West Lafayette, Indiana, for the Big Ten Championships beginning Wednesday.Last year, the Buckeyes finished in fourth place with a total of 859 points, claiming four individual Big Ten titles as well as one relay title for five championships overall. This was the sixth time since 2010 that OSU earned a top-five finish, and the Buckeyes’ four individual titles and one relay title made the year the most successful one since 1991.With four Big Ten teams ranked ahead of it, OSU will need strong performances by all swimmers to make a run. However, the main focus is on the factors that it’s able to control.“When you’re at Ohio State, the expectation is to put together championship teams. So, we want to compete for Big Ten titles and be one of the ten best teams in the country, but the truth is we can’t control that,” OSU coach Bill Dorenkott said. “What we can control is putting the strongest, fittest, most prepared kids in the pool at Big Tens, and who we compete against is irrelevant.”To ensure they do so, the team will be taking 25 swimmers to compete in Indiana, several of whom are returning Big Ten contenders, including senior Taylor Vargo. During last year’s Big Ten Championships, Vargo finished fifth in the 100-yard breaststroke and eighth in the 200-yard breaststroke. She will be competing in both races again this year, as well as the 100-yard individual medley and possibly a relay. This year, her personal goals are to enjoy her senior year, move up a couple of spots from last year and improve her times, Vargo said. However, her focus remains on the team rather than herself.“I’d say we’re focusing more on preparing to go to Purdue and swim as a team, not as an individual,” Vargo said. “We always go through the mantra, ‘The goal is not to win, the goal is to improve.’ Whether it’s your technique, or half a fraction of a second, or moving up two spots — go in and swim your best. Focus on the little things.”Vargo’s teammate, senior Lindsey Clary is another returning Big Ten contender who will be competing in the 400-yard individual medley, 500-yard freestyle and the 1,650-yard freestyle — all for the fourth consecutive year — at the Big Ten Championships.Last year Clary set new OSU records in all three events and took home Big Ten titles in both the 400-yard individual medley and the 1,650-yard freestyle with times of 4:03.64 and 15:49.98 respectively. She will also be competing in the 800-yard freestyle relay.Clary said she is looking forward to improving at the Big Ten Championships this year, and is hoping to inspire her teammates as well. “Each year you want to get better. I was extremely happy with how I swam last year, so I want to repeat that and hopefully swim even faster,” Clary said. “Especially to put points up for my team because I know that if someone has a good swim it inspires everyone else, so I’m hoping to be that person for the team.”In addition to Clary and Vargo, OSU has five other athletes who have posted top-10 times in the Big Ten this season including junior Meg Bailey, freshman Kathrin Demler, freshman Molly Kowal, junior Liz Li and senior Zulal Zeren.“This is a good group. They’ve done the work, they’re well prepared, and I’m looking forward to seeing what we can do,” Dorenkott said. “We’re looking toward being our best for seven sessions, three and a half days in February. That’s what we want to do.”The Big Ten Championships are set to begin Wednesday evening at the Boilermaker Aquatic Center in West Lafayette, Indiana. The competition runs through Saturday evening with preliminaries beginning Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 11 a.m. Finals begin each night at 6:30 p.m. read more

Fords CityOne Challenge wants to help Austin improve its mobility

first_img More From Roadshow Digit is a robot that wants to put parcels on your porch 0 Ford 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value More about 2020 Ford Explorer ST Now playing: Watch this: Review • 2020 Ford Explorer ST review: A midsize SUV with a focus on fast Car Culture Car Industry 2020 Ford Explorer ST shows us the power of the EcoBoostcenter_img 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Preview • 2020 Ford Explorer Hybrid first drive: A new kind of Explorer Tags Ford 5:41 Post a comment Share your voice Enlarge ImageFord’s GoRide Health, which provides on-demand transportation to help the elderly and disabled get to their medical appointments, would be a pretty good example of the solutions you might see from the City:One project. Ford Improving a city’s mobility landscape is about more than just throwing hundreds of scooters onto the sidewalks. It’s about coming up with clever ways to improve transportation for everyone, and for Ford’s latest venture in Austin, it wants everyone in the city to chime in with their ideas and maybe get the money to flesh it out a bit.Ford announced on Monday that it has launched the Austin City:One Challenge in Texas, with the help of the Austin Transportation Department’s Smart Mobility arm. It’s a crowdsourcing program of sorts, allowing Regular Joes and Janes to pitch mobility ideas and, if it has legs, people could receive up to $100,000 to test the ideas in pilot-project form.Here’s how it works. Austinites can head to the City:One Challenge’s website to share their experiences with mobility in the city, and there are community workshop sessions that people can join, as well, to help come up with ideas and potential solutions. Ford, as well as its collaborators including Dell, AT&T and Microsoft, will help the ideas take shape and actual ideas can start being pitched in the last week of August. In October, a committee will pick 12 finalists who will then create a final proposal, and the top ideas will receive up to $100,000 in funding to see if those ideas really can help.Again, the focus isn’t on throwing more wheeled vehicles at the populace. The Austin City:One Challenge is more about improving access to the necessities like grocery stores and doctors’ offices. It will place a priority on creating solutions for underserved communities and those who actually need better mobility options, not bros who are too lazy to walk six blocks to the next bar.Austin is now the fourth city in which Ford has operated a City:One program this year, following Indianapolis, Detroit and Mexico City. Last year, Ford kicked off the initiative in Pittsburgh, Miami-Dade County and Grand Rapids, Michigan. Some of the winning ideas in 2018 included reducing student pick-up lines at schools and devising safer transportation methods for people who work night shifts. 10 Photoslast_img read more

Budget 2017 Health care costs may rise if so far untaxable services

first_imgMedical care costs would go up and India’s national goal to provide universal healthcare coverage to all will be hit if Union Finance Minister Arun Jaitley decides to bring health care services and facilities under the purview of the Goods and Services Tax (GST), a research paper by Assocham-TechSci cautioned.Budget 2017: Four factors likely to create uncertainty, says Motilal Oswal SecuritiesCurrently, certain health care services fall within the ambit of tax, while other services are non-taxable.Service tax is NOT applicable when:1. The service provider is not a hospital, nursing home or multi-specialty clinic 2. The service is provided by an independent doctor or a resident doctor of a hospital 3. Preventive care offered to the insured person 4. Payment made by the individual for services obtained by the individualHowever, service tax IS applicable on services provided by any hospital, multi-specialty clinic or nursing home for:1. Health check-ups 2. Corporate health check-ups 3. Health insurance plans by insurance companies”A large number of items like food and other essentials for a common household are being kept outside the purview of the GST. The health care is equally important and essential, important only next to food. So, there is a strong case for the sector to be spared the GST,” Assocham secretary general DS Rawat said. While presenting his fourth Budget on February 1, Jaitley is expected to announce the government’s road map to implement the GST. The trade body said those health care services exempted from service tax currently should be continued even after the implementation of the GST regime for at least 10 years. The paper also advocated that Jaitley should significantly raise tax exemption on preventive health check-ups under section 80-D of the Income Tax Act and announce a health care infrastructure medical innovation fund in the forthcoming Budget.Additionally, it said the GST exemption should cover the health insurance premium, as the same is exempted from the service tax at present and demanded to increase the depreciation rate on medical devices, equipment from 15 percent to 30 percent.Also, corporate income tax incentives, which are currently given on capital expenditure for hospitals having 100 beds and above, need to be extended to greenfield hospitals with 50 beds to encourage better health care facilities in tier 2, 3 and 4 cities.last_img read more

On May 1 2012 Porter Stansberry and I made a bet

first_imgOn May 1, 2012, Porter Stansberry and I made a bet. Porter predicted that oil would go below US$40 per barrel within 12 months. I stated that there was no chance that this would happen (my reasons are presented at the link above). Putting our money where our mouths are, we both agreed to bet 100 ounces of silver on the matter. I have a lot of respect for Porter, who is a very smart man. When he talks, I listen. But when he discussed the reasons why he thought oil was going below US$40 per barrel, I knew I had him – this was going to be one of the easiest bets I have ever made. One of Porter’s main arguments was that a global shale-oil revolution would push volume way up and prices way down. It is definitely a sensible argument, yet it was missing something very critical: timing. The shale gas boom that happened in the United States did not occur in a vacuum. Rather, it was built upon decades of experience in new technologies such as hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. This was then based off of more than 150 years in conventional oil and gas exploration. Today in North America, there are thousands of rigs and hundreds of thousands of skilled oil and gas workers to work on the projects. This simply does not exist in the rest of the world. For a new shale discovery – however large it may be – it would take years just to prove up its commercial viability, another few years to get the infrastructure running, and even more years before it produces enough to matter. This means there are tremendous opportunities to profit – for those who are in the know – while we wait for the rest of the world to catch up. A similar situation is shaping up in the nuclear sector. Many countries rely on nuclear power and are planning to expand its use – the US among them – yet companies involved in the mining and refinement of uranium remain in a slump. We at Casey Research have created a webinar discussing these issues; it’s titled The Myth of American Energy Independence: Is Nuclear the Ultimate Contrarian Investment?, and it will premier May 21 at 2 p.m. EDT. Featured participants include Chairman Emeritus of the UK Atomic Energy Authority Barbara Thomas Judge, former US Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham, and former Canadian Minister of Natural Resources Herb Dhaliwal. We will provide an expert, insider’s perspective on the global nuclear power scene, showing you how to leverage its rising importance in your portfolio for potentially life-changing gains. Learn more about the free webinar and reserve your place today.last_img read more

Echocardiography may aid in patient selection for TMVR

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 18 2019Clinicians should use echocardiography, an ultrasound that shows the heart’s structure and function, when determining whether patients with heart failure and a leaking heart valve are likely to benefit from valve repair, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 68th Annual Scientific Session.The new study offers additional insights on the COAPT trial, which investigated the use of a procedure called transcatheter mitral valve repair (TMVR) in patients with secondary mitral regurgitation, a condition where the mitral valve does not close properly due to problems with the heart’s pumping chambers. In 2018, COAPT researchers reported that patients undergoing TMVR with the MitraClip device had significantly better rates of survival at two years compared to those receiving standard medications alone.To help translate COAPT’s findings into practical guidance for clinical decisions, the new study details how echocardiography can be used to diagnose secondary mitral regurgitation, along with how the researchers used a multi-parametric algorithm adapted from the American Society of Echocardiography and ACC guidelines to determine which patients were eligible to participate in the study and track the valve’s function over the course of two years. While clinicians routinely use echocardiograms when assessing mitral regurgitation, there is no worldwide standard for diagnosing secondary mitral regurgitation with this tool, limiting its application. As a result, details on the study methodology are important for informing clinical practice, researchers said.”We found echocardiography is valuable for assessing patients with secondary mitral regurgitation on multiple levels,” said Federico M. Asch, MD, director of the Echocardiography Core Lab at MedStar Health Research Institute, associate professor of medicine at Georgetown University and the study’s lead author. “Echocardiography should be used to determine which patients are candidates for TMVR, and it should also be used after MitraClip implantation to see the results of the procedure.”COAPT enrolled 614 patients treated at 78 medical centers in the U.S. and Canada and randomly assigned them to receive the MitraClip or maximally tolerated medical therapy as recommended by clinical guidelines, which typically includes diuretics, beta blockers and other medications, and sometimes cardiac resynchronization therapy (a pacemaker). All participants had heart failure and moderate to severe secondary mitral regurgitation at the start of the trial. Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is too weak to pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs. Secondary mitral valve regurgitation frequently coexists with heart failure, worsens patients’ symptoms and affects their quality of life and survival.Related StoriesOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustResearchers used echocardiography to image participants’ hearts before enrollment and during follow-up visits at one, six, 12, 18 and 24 months. They developed an algorithm that was used by expert echocardiographers to interpret the heart images, evaluate the functioning of the valve and determine whether patients were appropriate candidates for the MitraClip procedure. Follow-up assessments revealed that the repaired valve was effective at preventing backward flow of blood through the valve (mitral regurgitation), and that this effect persisted throughout the two years of follow-up.In addition, the study focused on identifying characteristics of the heart, measurable with an echocardiogram, that may predict which patients would have a better or worse response to TMVR. In this analysis, researchers found that TMVR was equally beneficial across all subgroups analyzed, including the size, function or pressures of the heart’s chambers, leading them to conclude that all patients with similar characteristics to those in the trial should be considered for this intervention.”MitraClip was shown to be beneficial in the study population in all sub-groups analyzed, regardless of patients’ echocardiographic characteristics,” Asch said. “While we learned that patients with higher pulmonary hypertension are at higher risk after they receive the MitraClip, they still do better than if they would not have had the intervention done. Doing an echocardiogram is critical in determining if a patient is a good candidate for MitraClip and in following these patients to evaluate results of the procedure in the long run.” Source:https://www.acc.org/last_img read more