10 months agoChelsea goalkeeper Kepa: Beating Watford so important

first_imgChelsea goalkeeper Kepa: Beating Watford so importantby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea goalkeeper Kepa Arrizabalaga believes they’re back on track after victory at Watford.Kepa meet Crystal Palace later today.”After the Leicester game at home, we wanted to bounce back,” said Kepa. “We were great in the first half, then in the second half Leicester were better than us. We found it hard.”After the Leicester game it was important to get back on track and there’s no better way to get back on track than beating a great team away from home.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

a month ago​West Ham announce official travel partner

first_img​West Ham announce official travel partnerby Ian Ferrisa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveWest Ham United have announced Nirvana as their official travel partner, reports, www.sportspromedia.com/.The deal will see the company, which specialises in event travel, accommodation and logistics for sporting and leisure events, provide exclusive travel offers to Hammers fans.Nirvana adds West Ham to a list of sporting partners, which include Paralympics GB, British Triathlon and the Ironman European Tour Series. For the Premier League club, Nirvana adds to a list of recent commercial deals in recent months, having signed up the likes of Monster Energy, Ivacy VPN and Osonyq.Karim Virani, West Ham United’s commercial and digital director, said: “It’s fantastic to sign up Nirvana as our official travel partner. Their expertise in planning and logistics will benefit our squads as they travel around the country, and in time we’ll work with Nirvana to bring exclusive offers to our supporters too.” TagsPremiership NewsAbout the authorIan FerrisShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Video: Colin Cowherd, Joel Klatt Explain Why They Believe Michigan State Can Win It All

first_imgColin Cowherd previews the Big 10 Championship on The Herd.colin cowherd joel klatt high on michigan stateMichigan State has an all-important contest this Saturday, as the Spartans take on undefeated Iowa in the Big Ten title game. The contest, which is being played between the No. 4 and No. 5 ranked teams in the College Football Playoff rankings, is a de facto national quarterfinal.Thursday, FOX Sports radio host Colin Cowherd and guest Joel Klatt debated whether they believe the Spartans are capable of not just winning that game – but winning the national championship. Both do, citing Connor Cook, the team’s offensive line and the fact that they’re getting healthy at the right time.Michigan State and Iowa kick off at 8:00 PM on FOX.last_img read more

Rickmers Maritime to Restructure Debt amid Liquidation Fears

first_imgzoom Singapore-listed containership owner Rickmers Maritime will not be able to pay USD 179.7 million of senior debt which is due in March 2017, the company said in an investor presentation filed to the Singapore Exchange.Furthermore, due to adverse market conditions which affected the company’s financial performance, Rickmers Maritime said it will not be able to meet on-going coupon and principal payments of the SGD 100 million (USD 73.1 million) 8.45% notes due in May 2017.The company is asking investors to exchange their debt with SGD 28 million of new perpetual bonds to avoid liquidation and total loss on the notes. This would also allow continued coupon payments under the new securities, Rickmers Maritime said.Tomas Norton de Matos, Chief Financial Officer of Rickmers Trust Management (RTM), earlier said that the restructuring process was “fairly complex and made more difficult by current market conditions.” “Nevertheless, we remain focused on securing a unified single credit facility that is sustainable and that gives the trust greater flexibility and a longer runway to manage its liabilities and growth. This will enable us to address the USD 100 million three-year notes, maturing on May 15, 2017,” he added.Rickmers Maritime recorded a net loss of USD 55.6 million in the second quarter of this year, compared to a loss of USD 15.7 million in the same period last year, a change of 255%.The company’s charter revenue during the period fell to USD 18 million from USD 28.5 million seen in the second quarter of 2015, mostly due to reduced charter rates and a lower vessel utilization rate amid a worsened charter market.last_img read more

Rep Hornberger takes House oath of office announces office staff and contact

first_imgState Rep. Pamela Hornberger takes a ceremonial oath of office on the House floor with family members, from left, nephew Eric Allen; daughter Olivia Malburg; and father Robert Hornberger.State Rep. Pamela Hornberger today was joined by her family for the first session day of the Michigan House of Representatives in the 99th Michigan Legislature, which included taking ceremonial and official oaths, meeting Gov. Rick Snyder and selecting her House seat.“This is exciting, like the first day of school, and it’s such a joyous moment to be able to share it with my family by my side,” said Hornberger, R-Chesterfield Township. “I’m looking forward to working with my colleagues in the House and Senate to keep Michigan on the comeback trail, and I want to hear from area residents with ideas and suggestions we can address together for our state and our hometown.”Hornberger’s Lansing office can be contacted by addressing letters to the State Capitol, Lansing, MI 48909-7514; calling 517-373-8931; and by email, PamelaHornberger@house.mi.gov.She is assisted by her office staff, Mel “Sonny” Koch and Phil Kraft.Koch, a Macomb Township resident, has six years of experience as House legislative office staff. He earned a master’s degree in American history from Eastern Michigan University, a bachelor’s degree in history from Alma College and is a 2004 graduate of Chippewa Valley High School.Kraft, a Chesterfield resident and 2004 Anchor Bay High School graduate, previously served five years as constituent services representative for Congresswoman Candice Miller and is currently on the Macomb County Board of Commissioners. He earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from Saginaw Valley State University.“The 32nd House District and I are extremely fortunate to have Sonny and Phil on our team working for us,” Hornberger said. “Their knowledge and experience of our community and the government process means we are hitting the ground running.”##### Categories: Hornberger News,Hornberger Photos 11Jan Rep. Hornberger takes House oath of office, announces office staff and contact infolast_img read more

Gut microbiota can help predict occurrence of colorectal cancer

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 1 2019Gut microbiota – the population of microbes that live in our intestine – can be used to predict the occurrence of colorectal cancer, the second most common type of cancer in women and the third in men.Research by an international team of scientists including Brazilians has found a link between colorectal cancer and changes in gut microbiota patterns that do not depend on the dietary habits of the populations studied. The discovery paves the way to the development of non-invasive tests capable of predicting emergence of the disease.The study is published this Monday, April 1, in the journal Nature Medicine. Its first author is Andrew Maltez Thomas, who has a PhD in bioinformatics from the University of São Paulo (USP), Brazil. Thomas was supported by São Paulo Research Foundation – FAPESP via a scholarship for a research internship at the University of Trento in Italy.In one of the largest and most varied surveys ever conducted on the topic, the researchers combined metagenomics, bioinformatics and machine learning (with the use of artificial intelligence) to correlate the occurrence of colorectal cancer with gut microbiota data for 969 people in Canada, China, France, Germany, Japan and the United States.The findings identified groups of microorganisms associated with colorectal cancer in all the populations studied, and signatures in the microbial metabolism (patterns of metabolites produced by microorganisms) that can be used to predict the occurrence of the disease. The research had two other important outcomes. One is the discovery in the intestines of colorectal cancer patients of a specific species of bacterium which is commonly found in the mouth and airways. The other is a correlation between colorectal cancer and the presence of the gene for a microbial enzyme that degrades choline, an essential vitamin B group nutrient.The study found higher levels of the bacterial species Fusobacterium nucleatum in colorectal cancer patients than in healthy individuals. This bacterium normally inhabits regions of the mouth, and the acidity of other parts of the gastrointestinal tract was thought to be fatal to it.”Larger numbers of oral bacteria tend to travel to the intestine in colorectal cancer patients. This migration may cause inflammation in the intestine, giving rise to the tumor,” Thomas said. “However, we don’t know the actual reason for the migration, only that there’s a link between the presence of these bacteria in the intestine and colorectal cancer and that the link deserves to be investigated further.”The other discovery, a significant presence of the gene for the microbial enzyme choline trimethylamine-lyase (cutC) in fecal samples from colorectal cancer patients, reinforces the possibility of a carcinogenic link between gut microbiota and a fatty diet, indicated by previous research. “When the enzyme cleaves choline, which is abundant in diets containing large amounts of red meat and other fatty foods, it releases acetaldehyde, a well-known carcinogen,” Thomas said.In the study, the researchers used data on the composition and abundance of all bacteria found in 969 fecal samples. To develop a simple method of analysis that can be widely used by clinics and hospitals, they selected the statistically significant bacteria.”Our results from 16 species of bacteria were comparable to those from analyses using all species. This is an important step in the development of a simple diagnostic tool that dispenses with the need to sequence the entire microbiota yet has the necessary precision,” Thomas said.Association is not a causal linkResearch on the links between gut microbiota and human health has grown in the last ten years, but the new study innovates by conceiving of bacteria as markers of the development of disease.Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerStructure of bacteria responsible for traveler’s diarrhea decipheredBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancer”Markers are typically looked for directly in association with tumor cells. We use a different concept. Our analysis is based on changes in a relatively small set of bacteria in a spectrum of hundreds of bacteria that live in the gut and may indicate the presence of a disease,” said Emmanuel Dias-Neto, a researcher at A.C. Camargo Cancer Center’s International Research Center (CIPE) and a co-author of the article.Sequencing of DNA obtained from gut microbiota enabled the researchers to identify the bacteria present in each fecal sample, to measure the quantity of each bacterium, and to identify variants in their genomes that may be linked to different outcomes, such as a heightened risk of colorectal cancer.It should be stressed, however, that the study did not show that alterations in gut microbiota cause colorectal cancer.”We detected an association, but that doesn’t necessarily imply a causal link. The question is whether specific bacteria can cause cancer or cancer creates a different environment in the colorectal duct and thereby favors certain bacteria over others. We don’t yet have an answer, which would be fundamental for the results of the research described in the article to help develop therapies to treat colorectal cancer,” said João Carlos Setubal, Full Professor in the University of São Paulo’s Biochemistry Department, coordinator of the same university’s Interunit Graduate Program in Bioinformatics, and also a co-author of the article. Setubal and Dias-Neto supervised Thomas’s PhD research.Computational analysisAccording to the researchers, this may be the largest-ever study of colorectal cancer based on data from fecal samples and such diverse populations. The group analyzed data from five public studies and two other studies by researchers at the University of Trento.With the data from these seven studies they were able to identify enzymes and bacteria, and to work out how gut microbiota can predict the development of colorectal cancer. They used data from two other studies with 200 samples to validate their findings.”DNA sequencing of the samples, which required distinguishing between microbiota DNA and human DNA, was a means of identifying and quantifying the species of microorganisms and their genes present in the samples,” Thomas said. “We extracted DNA from the fecal samples and sequenced it. We then used computational methods to analyze the data. As a result we were able to identify and quantify the species and gene abundance.”Because the data came from different studies, the researchers used sophisticated statistical methods to analyze them as an ensemble.”We used meta-analytical statistical methods and machine learning techniques to find out how predictive the results were,” Thomas said.The findings were validated by Nicola Segata, a computational biologist at the University of Trento and supervisor abroad for the project, and reinforced by another study performed at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Germany on the links between gut microbiome and cancer. An article on the EMBL study is published in the same issue of Nature Medicine.”While preparing the articles, we exchanged data and information with the other group in a partnership that proved highly important to reinforce our findings. Although we used machine learning techniques and different statistical methods, we arrived at the same conclusion that the gut microbiome can predict the presence of colorectal cancer in different populations and studies,” Thomas said. Source:http://agencia.fapesp.br/intestinal-bacteria-can-be-used-to-predict-occurrence-of-colorectal-cancer/30148/last_img read more

Perovskite solar cells leap toward commercialization

first_img Citation: Perovskite solar cells leap toward commercialization (2018, September 28) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-perovskite-solar-cells-commercialization.html Solar energy has long been considered the most sustainable option for replacing our dependence on fossil fuels, but technologies for converting solar energy into electricity must be both efficient and inexpensive. Journal information: Nature Communications In developing the method, the scientists realized that making the perovskite layer 1 micron thick increased the working life of the solar cell significantly. “The solar cells are almost unchanged after working for 800 hours,” says Dr. Zonghao Liu, a postdoctoral scholar in Prof. Qi’s research unit at OIST and the first author of the study. In addition, a thicker coating not only boosted the stability of the solar cells but also facilitated the fabrication processes, thereby lowering its production costs. “The thicker absorber layer ensures good reproducibility of solar cell fabrication, which is a key advantage for mass manufacturing in the realistic industrial-scale setting,” says Dr. Liu.The big challenge Prof. Qi and his team now face is in increasing the size of their newly designed solar cell from the 0.1 mm2 sized prototype to large commercial-sized panels that can be several feet long. This is where the industry can help. “There exists a large gap between the findings in lab and reality, and the industry is not always ready to cover this entire gap by itself. So, the researchers need to take one more necessary step beyond their labs and meet the industry half-way,” says Prof. Qi.To take that step, Prof. Qi and team received a generous grant from OIST’s Technology Development and Innovation Center, under their Proof-of-Concept Program. With that funding, the team has built a working model of their new perovskite solar modules consisting of multiple solar cells on 5cm × 5cm substrates, with an active area of 12 cm2- much bigger than their experimental prototype but smaller than what is required for commercial purposes. Although the process of upscaling has reduced the efficiency of the cells from 20% to 15%, the researchers are optimistic that they will be able to improve the way they work in the coming years and successfully commercialize their use. Provided by Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Scientists from the Energy Materials and Surface Sciences Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) believe they’ve found a winning formula in a new method to fabricate low-cost high-efficiency solar cells. Prof. Yabing Qi and his team from OIST in collaboration with Prof. Shengzhong Liu from Shaanxi Normal University, China, developed the cells using the materials and compounds that mimic the crystalline structure of the naturally occurring mineral perovskite. They describe their technique in a study published in the journal Nature Communications.In what Prof. Qi refers to as “the golden triangle,” solar cell technologies need to fulfill three conditions to be worth commercializing: their conversion rate of sunlight into electricity must be high, they must be inexpensive to produce, and they must have a long lifespan. Today, most commercial solar cells are made from crystalline silicon, which has a relatively high efficiency of around 22%. Though silicon, the raw material for these solar cells, is abundant, processing it tends to be complex and shoots up the manufacturing costs, making the finished product expensive.Perovskite offers a more affordable solution, Prof. Qi says. Perovskite was first used to make solar cells in 2009 by Prof. Tsutomu Miyasaka’s research team at Toin University of Yokohama, Japan, and since then it has been rapidly gaining importance. “Research on perovskite cells is very promising. In only nine years, the efficiency of these cells went from 3.8 % to 23.3%. Other technologies have taken over 30 years of research to reach the same level,” explains Prof. Qi. The fabrication method he and his research team have developed produces perovskite solar cells with an efficiency comparable to crystalline silicon cells, but it is potentially much cheaper than making silicon solar cells.To make the new cells, the researchers coated transparent conductive substrates with perovskite films that absorb sunlight very efficiently. They used a gas-solid reaction-based technique in which the substrate is first coated with a layer of hydrogen lead triiodide incorporated with a small amount of chlorine ions and methylamine gas – allowing them to reproducibly make large uniform panels, each consisting of multiple solar cells. Bright future for solar cell technology Dr. Zonghao Liu (left) and Prof. Yabing Qi (right) with the 5 cm × 5 cm perovskite solar module that they developed in their lab at OIST. Credit: Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology More information: Zonghao Liu et al. Gas-solid reaction based over one-micrometer thick stable perovskite films for efficient solar cells and modules, Nature Communications (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-06317-8last_img read more

Alliance Bank to undergo streamlining

first_img Economy13 Jul 2019Much to benefit from Malaysia-China tiesBanking12 Jul 2019Fed’s Williams joins with other officials leaning toward rate cutsOil & Gas11 Jul 2019OPEC action and trade truce may give oil the lift it needs Corporate News Tags / Keywords: When asked, Alliance Bank neither confirmed nor denied the matter.Unlock exclusive insights, analyses, and curated news on the economy on The Star Online’s Business section with Starbiz Premium.SubscribeLog In More Stories THE spotlight is on the country’s smallest lender, Alliance Bank Malaysia Bhd, which could be looking at paring down its stake in its wholly-owned subsidiary, Alliance Investment Bank Bhd (AIBB).The move, if it materialises, will come amid an extremely competitive time for the investment banking scene both here and globally where it is becoming increasingly difficult to survive without a strong niche.IPO deals have dried up in recent years not only here but regionally while other deal-making activities in Asia have had their worst start to this year since about five years ago due mostly to a global economic slowdown. A source says that advisers have already been hired to start off the process of Alliance Bank selling its majority interest in AIBB. Corporate News13 Jul 2019IJM contract termination likely due to deadline issueCorporate News13 Jul 2019Yinson continues to draw interestProperty13 Jul 2019Pioneering the wellness concept for offices in Malaysialast_img read more