Study shows few serious problems among smallpox vaccinees

first_imgDec 14, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Exactly 100 of about 38,000 civilians who received smallpox shots in a federal program in 2003 suffered serious adverse events afterward, signaling that the program successfully screened out most people at risk for complications, according to a recent report.The safety monitoring system “achieved its goal of safe administration of smallpox vaccine among a limited number of DHHS [Department of Health and Human Services] volunteers through successful exclusion of at-risk individuals and rapid detection of unexpected adverse events,” says the report, published in the Dec 7 Journal of the American Medical Association.The authors, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), analyzed adverse events reported as a result of the smallpox vaccination program from January through October of 2003. HHS launched the program for healthcare and emergency response workers out of concern about the possibility of a terrorist release of smallpox virus. The report’s first author is Christine G. Casey, MD, of the CDC’s National Immunization Program.Authorities originally hoped to vaccinate as many as 500,000 health workers, but only 37,901 received shots by the end of October 2003. Hospital and public health workers constituted 95% of those, with law enforcement and firefighters making up most of the rest, the report says. Most of the vaccinees (64%) were women, and more than 75% of them were between 40 and 64 years old and had received a smallpox shot before.The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) received 822 adverse-event reports related to the vaccinations, the report says. Of these, 100 were classified as serious events, for a rate of 26.4 per 10,000 vaccinees.Of the 100 serious events, 85 involved hospitalization or prolongation of hospitalization. Two people suffered permanent disability, and 10 experienced a life-threatening illness. The serious events included 21 classified as myopericarditis and 10 classified as ischemic events that were not expected on the basis of patient histories. Those 10 included six myocardial infarctions, two of which were fatal, and four cases of new or increased angina. Two cases of dilated cardiomyopathy occurring 2 to 3 months after vaccination were also reported.As a result of cardiac adverse events in both civilian and military smallpox vaccinees, the CDC issued a Health Alert Notice on Mar 26, 2003, that described the events and recommended deferring vaccination for at-risk people. None of the 10 ischemic cardiac events in vaccinees occurred after the alert notice triggered cardiac screening of potential vacccinees, the report says.The authors note that US military personnel recently vaccinated against smallpox have had a significantly increased rate of myocarditis, compared with unvaccinated military members. However, the report says the rate of ischemic cardiac events in civilian vaccinees does not appear to exceed the rate in a comparable unvaccinated population.”Whether smallpox vaccination is causally associated with ischemic events remains uncertain,” the authors write.Two cases of generalized vaccinia and one case of postvaccinial encephalitis were reported in the program. But there were no cases of transmission of vaccinia (the vaccine virus) to others and no severe reactions requiring treatment with vaccinia immune globulin.Among the 722 “nonserious” adverse events reported, the most common signs and symptoms were fever, 18.9%; rash, 18.4%; pain, 16.0%; headache, 15.2%; fatigue, 13.5%; and pruritus, 13.4%. Compared with those reporting nonserious events, people reporting serious events were more likely to be older than 40 (81% versus 64%).People who had been vaccinated previously were slightly overrepresented among the vaccinees with serious adverse events, the authors found. They say this is not surprising, since the revaccinees were older than the primary vaccinees and may have had a higher risk of adverse events because of age-related underlying chronic disease.The rates of expected, preventable, and noncardiac adverse events in the civilian vaccinees were about the same as rates in the much larger military vaccination program, the authors found.Casey CG, Iskander JK, Roper MH, et al. Adverse events associated with smallpox vaccination in the United States, January-October 2003. JAMA 2005 Dec 7;294(21):2734-43 [Abstract]See also:Safety summary for Department of Defense smallpox vaccination programhttp://www.smallpox.mil/event/SPSafetySum.asplast_img read more

Freddie Ljungberg can produce ‘something special’ at Arsenal, says Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang

first_imgAubameyang scored both of Arsenal’s goals at Carrow Road (Picture: Getty)Aubameyang hopes to set a positive example for his team-mates after Ljungberg handed him the captain’s armband at Norwich.‘I try to give the guys all my positivity,’ the Gabonese added.‘As always, I try to be an example, working hard.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘I think the mood is good. We tried to find more confidence in winning games. We try our best.‘Unai Emery was sacked, now we have Freddie and we’re all focused on one thing, to be back winning.‘Today we did maybe not a perfect game but a good job and we’ll try to win the next one.‘We have positive things to take. We didn’t play bad, we played good.’MORE: Jack Grealish urged to join Chelsea in £80m deal after stunning Manchester United display Freddie Ljungberg can produce ‘something special’ at Arsenal, says Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang Metro Sport ReporterMonday 2 Dec 2019 12:38 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link6.7kShares Comment Advertisement Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang has high hopes for Arsenal interim manager Freddie Ljungberg (Picture: Getty)Arsenal caretaker boss Freddie Ljungberg can produce ‘something special’ as he has the club ‘in his heart’. That’s according to Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang.Ljungberg has taken charge on a temporary basis following Unai Emery’s dismissal last week and the Swede began his reign as interim head coach with a 2-2 draw away to Norwich on Sunday afternoon.While the Gunners have every confidence in Ljungberg ability, it’s likely an external candidate will be brought in to steer the side out of the hole they currently find themselves in.Mauricio Pochettino, Brendan Rodgers, Max Allegri and Patrick Allegri have all been linked, but Aubameyang has backed Ljungberg to turn around the club’s fortunes and make himself a contender for the job.ADVERTISEMENT Ljungberg gives presser after Arsenal’s 2-2 draw with NorwichTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 5:06FullscreenLjungberg gives presser after Arsenal’s 2-2 draw with Norwichhttps://metro.co.uk/video/ljungberg-gives-presser-arsenals-2-2-draw-norwich-2060662/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.‘He can give us something special,’ the striker said after his brace at Carrow Road.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘If I’m not wrong, he was part of the ­Invincibles. His career speaks for itself. We will try to follow him and give the best for him.‘Everybody is respectful of Freddie. He played for Arsenal, he knows as a player how we feel. It’s interesting to have him.‘We had only one [training] session with him, maybe two for those guys who didn’t play on Thursday.‘We will see this week what is going to happen. I think it’s good for us. He played for Arsenal and he has this in his heart.’ Advertisementlast_img read more

Treasury and IRS to delay tax payment deadline by 90 days

first_imgTaxpayers will get a three-month reprieve to pay the income taxes they owe for 2019, but you still have to file by April 15th, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Tuesday at a news conference.As part of its coronavirus response, the federal government will give filers 90 days to pay income taxes due on up to $1 million in tax owed, Mnuchin said in Washington. The reprieve on that amount would cover many pass-through entities and small businesses, he said.Corporate filers would get the same length of time to pay amounts due on up to $10 million in taxes owed, Mnuchin said.During that three-month deferral period, taxpayers won’t be subject to interest and penalties, he said.You should still get your 2019 income tax return in to the federal government as soon as possible, especially if you’re due a refund and need cash.While the federal government is granting taxpayers a little more time, you should still check in on your state’s position.Some states have rolled out delays due to coronavirus.For more on the IRS guidelines and the coronavirus listen to 850 WFTL’s interview with tax expert Lawrence Levy from Levy and Associates.https://www.850wftl.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Lawrence-Levy.mp3last_img read more