Study shows few serious problems among smallpox vaccinees

first_imgDec 14, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Exactly 100 of about 38,000 civilians who received smallpox shots in a federal program in 2003 suffered serious adverse events afterward, signaling that the program successfully screened out most people at risk for complications, according to a recent report.The safety monitoring system “achieved its goal of safe administration of smallpox vaccine among a limited number of DHHS [Department of Health and Human Services] volunteers through successful exclusion of at-risk individuals and rapid detection of unexpected adverse events,” says the report, published in the Dec 7 Journal of the American Medical Association.The authors, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), analyzed adverse events reported as a result of the smallpox vaccination program from January through October of 2003. HHS launched the program for healthcare and emergency response workers out of concern about the possibility of a terrorist release of smallpox virus. The report’s first author is Christine G. Casey, MD, of the CDC’s National Immunization Program.Authorities originally hoped to vaccinate as many as 500,000 health workers, but only 37,901 received shots by the end of October 2003. Hospital and public health workers constituted 95% of those, with law enforcement and firefighters making up most of the rest, the report says. Most of the vaccinees (64%) were women, and more than 75% of them were between 40 and 64 years old and had received a smallpox shot before.The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) received 822 adverse-event reports related to the vaccinations, the report says. Of these, 100 were classified as serious events, for a rate of 26.4 per 10,000 vaccinees.Of the 100 serious events, 85 involved hospitalization or prolongation of hospitalization. Two people suffered permanent disability, and 10 experienced a life-threatening illness. The serious events included 21 classified as myopericarditis and 10 classified as ischemic events that were not expected on the basis of patient histories. Those 10 included six myocardial infarctions, two of which were fatal, and four cases of new or increased angina. Two cases of dilated cardiomyopathy occurring 2 to 3 months after vaccination were also reported.As a result of cardiac adverse events in both civilian and military smallpox vaccinees, the CDC issued a Health Alert Notice on Mar 26, 2003, that described the events and recommended deferring vaccination for at-risk people. None of the 10 ischemic cardiac events in vaccinees occurred after the alert notice triggered cardiac screening of potential vacccinees, the report says.The authors note that US military personnel recently vaccinated against smallpox have had a significantly increased rate of myocarditis, compared with unvaccinated military members. However, the report says the rate of ischemic cardiac events in civilian vaccinees does not appear to exceed the rate in a comparable unvaccinated population.”Whether smallpox vaccination is causally associated with ischemic events remains uncertain,” the authors write.Two cases of generalized vaccinia and one case of postvaccinial encephalitis were reported in the program. But there were no cases of transmission of vaccinia (the vaccine virus) to others and no severe reactions requiring treatment with vaccinia immune globulin.Among the 722 “nonserious” adverse events reported, the most common signs and symptoms were fever, 18.9%; rash, 18.4%; pain, 16.0%; headache, 15.2%; fatigue, 13.5%; and pruritus, 13.4%. Compared with those reporting nonserious events, people reporting serious events were more likely to be older than 40 (81% versus 64%).People who had been vaccinated previously were slightly overrepresented among the vaccinees with serious adverse events, the authors found. They say this is not surprising, since the revaccinees were older than the primary vaccinees and may have had a higher risk of adverse events because of age-related underlying chronic disease.The rates of expected, preventable, and noncardiac adverse events in the civilian vaccinees were about the same as rates in the much larger military vaccination program, the authors found.Casey CG, Iskander JK, Roper MH, et al. Adverse events associated with smallpox vaccination in the United States, January-October 2003. JAMA 2005 Dec 7;294(21):2734-43 [Abstract]See also:Safety summary for Department of Defense smallpox vaccination programhttp://www.smallpox.mil/event/SPSafetySum.asplast_img read more

Delta, pilots deal win key backing

first_imgA bankruptcy judge Wednesday approved the $280-million-a-year concessions agreement between Delta Air Lines Inc. and its pilots, rejecting claims by the government’s pension insurer that it should receive the compensation the pilots were promised if their pension is terminated. The decision came hours after rank-and-file pilots gave their nod to the deal. The agreement, which runs through 2009, will take effect today. The deal, which replaces an interim pact agreed to in December, includes an initial 14 percent pay cut for pilots and assurances the pilots union won’t fight any company effort to terminate the pilots’ pension. Judge Adlai Hardin signed the agreement during a hearing in White Plains, N.Y. Earlier in the day, pilots of the Atlanta-based airline, the nation’s No. 3 carrier, approved the deal with a vote of 61 percent in favor. The judge’s approval, the last hurdle in the process, came despite an objection filed by the government’s pension insurer, which insisted that a $650 million note and $2.1 billion unsecured claim that Delta has promised the pilots should belong to the agency if the pilots’ pension is terminated as expected. Hardin heard arguments from lawyers for both sides, but determined in the end that the agreement was in the best interest of the airline. The Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp. said afterward that it was reviewing its options, including the possibility of an appeal. “It was probably the most significant negotiation transaction we’ll face as part of this bankruptcy process,” Chief Financial Officer Edward Bastian said of the concessions deal. “It gives us the ability to put the past behind us and make Delta a success again.” The chairman of the pilots union’s executive committee, Lee Moak, said in a telephone interview that he was encouraged by the agreement getting final approval. “The sacrifices we have made were difficult,” Moak said. “It has been difficult and I am confident in the process going forward.” Also Wednesday, Delta said in a filing with the bankruptcy court that it lost $27 million in April. Excluding reorganization items, it would have posted a profit of $22 million in the 30-day period. As of April 30, Delta had $2.5 billion of unrestricted cash. It has posted losses of more than $14.4 billion since January 2001. In a letter to pilots after the pilot vote was made public, Delta’s top three executives said the ratification by the rank-and-file marks a new beginning for the airline. “If we seize this opportunity rather than squander it, Delta Air Lines once again can proudly become the gold standard of the industry,” the executives said. The cuts are in addition to $1 billion in annual concessions the pilots agreed to in a five-year deal in 2004. Hardin rejected the PBGC’s main argument, that a deal between Delta and the pilots union was illegal. He said that although, in some people’s minds, there was a link between the $650 million promise and the potential loss of the defined pension plan, that “did not render a private agreement between an employer and union illegal.” “That is not a legal proposition I can endorse,” he said. “So I must reject that.” Separately, a retired pilots group had objected to the new deal out of concern the Delta deal would ultimately reduce their benefits based on the pension being terminated. But their objection was resolved at Wednesday’s hearing. As part of the settlement, Delta has agreed to provide retired pilots an administrative claim of $9 million to cover a portion of certain pension benefits that the retired pilots would have gotten since the bankruptcy filing in September had the benefits not been frozen. An administrative claim is a debt incurred by a company that has filed for bankruptcy, with court approval. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more